Allan Eddy

Atlanta Artist Allan Eddy went blind in May of 2000 and the diagnosis was blindness for life. “The doctors explained to me that your optic nerve doesn’t repair itself so you’re going to be blind forever. But they were wrong. 7 to 9 months later I had some vision back.”

Allan described his unique vision for us. “I can’t see reds or greens easily but I can see blues and yellows very well and to this day it’s sort of a really unique phenomenon. Blues and yellows are like neon to me - they glow.

One of the problems that I have is that I see out of a really unique window. It’s a really odd shape - its sort of an upside down ‘U’ shape so I have a really hard time seeing the entire piece. I only see in sections and segments of a piece and parts of it come in and out of focus as I move my head around. The bigger the piece, the less of the surface I can see and to actually see the whole piece I have to stand way back which means I don’t get to see the detail.”

Today Allan’s palette is much brighter. “I would say that if you had to put an emotion to it that my new work is much more optimistic. My old work was darker and maybe more mysterious. The new work is bolder. I probably take more risks with my new work than I did before but that’s just the way art should be. It should grow and evolve as you age and as you work.”


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