Morning Routines

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My daughter likes for me to tickle and play with her as she’s waking up and getting out of the bed. Many mornings, when we don’t have play time it usually is because we’re rushed. However, I began to notice differences on mornings when we had play time and when we did not, so I decided to conduct a little experiment.

For two weeks, I kept track of the days she calmly got out of the bed, and the days she had to jump out of the bed as soon as I woke her, as well as days when I was rushed and we weren’t able to take our time and have a calm morning. I’m sure the results aren’t going to surprise you.

When I gave her this attention, she got ready quicker and was more independent, than days when we had to rush. Also, although I thought playing in the morning was a waste of time, we often were able to leave the house earlier than days when we didn’t play.

From this information, I devised an evening and morning to-do list.

Prepare the evening before. Place necessary items in the car or at the door, and make sure that your child’s clothes are ready. Set the table for breakfast the night before. Choose food items that your child can prepare herself. Teach your child a morning routine.
Determine how much time you need in the morning and add 15 minutes to it. That’s the time you need to get up. Avoid yelling or getting upset in the morning.

Of course, this wasn’t a scientific experiment and I’m sure the margin of error is great. But, it’s important to understand that what happens at home, before your child goes to school, can affect the rest of her day, regardless of age.

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