Remembering After The Test

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Do you remember how you used to cram for tests? Most of us had at least one experience where we waited until the last minute to study, and ended up pulling an all-nighter in order to be prepared for a big test. We usually passed the test. But, by the next day, we didn’t remember anything that we’d studied. Well, although most elementary age children don’t pull all-nighters studying for a test, when they wait until the night before or a couple of days before to study for a test, or the information is not reviewed after the test, they get the same results. They forget the information.

In elementary, much of new information that children learn is based upon them remembering information that they’ve already been taught. That’s why it’s important that children not only study for a test, but that they study to learn. When children study to learn, they typically spend a little more time reviewing information, reading and writing and answering questions about what they have learned. This helps the information move from their short-term memory into their long-term memory, and there are many ways that you can help them do this.

You can start by reviewing their class assignments every day. Go over any tests or worksheets that they bring home. Ask general questions. If you know what your child is studying, you can use that information during general practice. For example, if your child is learning how to tell time, you can ask him questions about time. For example, How many minutes do we have before dinner? You can ask your child to read the text book to you. Even older children like to read to their parents. Asks questions after they’ve read a page or two. You can also use spelling words in context, when you’re talking to your child. This not only allows him to become familiar with the words, using them in context helps him to learn and remember the definitions.

Children take in so much information on a daily basis. If they don’t store the important stuff, they’ll lose it, and in many instances have to re-learn it. If you take time to review your child’s assignments, help him study for tests, or ask questions about his school work or what he’s reading, it will increase his ability to remember what he’s learning each day.

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